Headlines

PHILADELPHIA INQUIRER: Letter: Corbett serves up tasty policy

Summary: 

The Coalition, United Way and Jewish Federation praise Pennsylvania's decision to preserve "Heat and Eat" and protect SNAP benefits for hundreds of thousands of residents.

March 23, 2014

Representing organizations that serve thousands of families and seniors across the Delaware Valley who struggle to put nutritious food on the table, we believe Gov. Corbett and state Department of Welfare Secretary Beverly D. Mackereth made the right decision by continuing the state's "heat and eat" program, preserving food assistance for 400,000 ("Gov. Corbett gets centered," March 11). Without the governor's intervention, these families would have faced devastating cuts to their food-stamp benefits, averaging $65 per month.

CENTRE DAILY TIMES: District launches districtwide free breakfast program with eye on students’ health, learning

Summary: 

Students at one local school district will be able to eat breakfast together every day for the rest of the school year. Philipsburg-Osceola passed a universal breakfast program last week.

March 15, 2014

BY LORI FALCE

Please pass the milk. And the Cocoa Puffs. Hey, are you going to eat that muffin?

Students at one local school district will be able to eat breakfast together every day for the rest of the school year. Philipsburg-Osceola passed a universal breakfast program last week.

Director of Food Services Laura Frye will begin March 25 serving kindergartners through high school seniors every morning, for free. The pilot program will continue through June, and Frye hopes to see it prove successful enough to continue next year.

SCRANTON TIMES-TRIBUNE: Poverty growing in area classrooms

Summary: 

Poverty is growing in classrooms, as nearly half of the students in Northeast Pennsylvania now qualify for free or reduced-price lunches.

March 16, 2014

BY SARAH HOFIUS HALL (STAFF WRITER)

Poverty is growing in classrooms, as nearly half of the students in Northeast Pennsylvania now qualify for free or reduced-price lunches.

That number has grown by 19 percent over the last five years, according to data released by the state Department of Education.
"The need is there," said Joseph Gorham, superintendent of Carbondale Area, where 68.6 percent of students - the highest in the region - qualify for the federal lunch program. "It's hard times in Northeastern Pennsylvania."

PHILADELPHIA INQUIRER: In surprising move, Corbett forestalls deep cuts in food stamps

Summary: 

Gov. Corbett on Wednesday night forestalled an estimated $3 billion in cuts to food stamps in the state over the next 10 years.

March 6, 2014

By Alfred Lubrano

WITF RADIO: Administration's food stamps decision nets praise from advocates & grocers

Summary: 

Anti-hunger groups and trade groups are applauding the Corbett administration's decision to prevent a change in federal policy from cutting food stamps for mostly seniors and people with disabilities.

March 7, 2014

By Mary Wilson, Capitol Bureau Chief

Anti-hunger groups and trade groups are applauding the Corbett administration's decision to prevent a change in federal policy from cutting food stamps for mostly seniors and people with disabilities.

The administration has not formally announced the change in policy, but Kait Gillis, a spokeswoman for the Department of Public Welfare, confirmed the change to the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette.

TRIBUNE-DEMOCRAT: Schools scramble to get kids to bite on breakfast

Summary: 

Data show that only a fraction of students eat breakfast at school – a situation that advocates for the hungry say is especially concerning given recent cuts to food stamp programs.

February 21, 2014

John Finnerty
CNHI Harrisburg Bureau

HARRISBURG — School cafeterias try all kinds of gimmicks to entice students to eat breakfast.

Children in Sharon might pass on cold cereal but gobble up sausage on a stick wrapped in pancake batter, said Alice Connolley, food service director for the city’s schools.

Students in Wattsburg like breakfast pizza – a pizza crust topped with tomato sauce, sausage and cheese – because they can eat it with their hands, said Janet Mullaney, nutrition director for the city’s schools.

DAILY NEWS: Editorial: Can't stomach it

Summary: 

As it regards the hungry, the Farm Bill is a load of bovine fertilizer.

February 4, 2014

As it regards the hungry, the Farm Bill is a load of bovine fertilizer

THE $8 billion in cuts to the food-stamp program over the next 10 years approved last week by the House in a new Farm Bill is being described as "small." Compared with the total Farm Bill - $950 billion over 10 years - "small" is an accurate term.

But to someone trying to feed a family who may now see food stamps slashed by up to $90 a month, those "small" cuts mean more days of gnawing hunger, of going without the basics, of hungry children.

ALLENTOWN MORNING-CALL: Food stamp cuts mean bigger pantry demand

Summary: 

Advocates of cutting SNAP have argued that charities could fill the gaps, but the Coalition Against Hunger refutes that idea. "Food banks in our state already can't keep up with the skyrocketing need."

February 4, 2014

By Dan Sheehan, Of The Morning Call
 
The Lehigh Valley's food banks have already noted greater demand for services since a cut in food stamps took effect in November.
 
And they expect more to come if, as expected, the U.S. Senate approves and the president signs an agriculture bill that further trims money for food stamps, formally called the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program. The House passed its version of the plan on Wednesday in a 251-166 vote.
 

PHILADELPHIA INQUIRER: N.J. better than Pa. in feeding children breakfast

Summary: 

New Jersey has shown marked increases in getting low-income children to eat breakfast in school, while Pennsylvania has demonstrated slow improvement in serving the meals.

January 30, 2014

By Alfred Lubrano
 
New Jersey has shown marked increases in getting low-income children to eat breakfast in school, while Pennsylvania has demonstrated slow improvement in serving the meals.
 
That's the word from the Food Research and Action Center (FRAC), which released its School Breakfast Scorecard this month. Based in Washington, FRAC is the leading antihunger advocacy group in America.
 

PITTSBURGH POST-GAZETTE: Food stamp cuts to hit Pa. harder

Summary: 

A proposed $8 billion in cuts to the food stamp program in the federal farm bill would fall disproportionately on recipients of the program in Pennsylvania and about a dozen other states.

January 30, 2014

By Kate Giammarise / Post-Gazette Harrisburg Bureau
HARRISBURG -- A proposed $8 billion in cuts to the food stamp program in the federal farm bill would fall disproportionately on recipients of the program in Pennsylvania and about a dozen other states.

The U.S. House approved the compromise, five-year farm bill, 251-166, Wednesday, setting up likely final passage by the Senate, which is expected to take up the bill later this week.